Norfolk Neighbourhood Safe Active Street

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

A safe, environmentally friendly neighbourhood that puts people first. That’s our vision and we need your help to decide how that could look for North Perth and Mount Lawley.

The City of Vincent has the opportunity to make improvements and changes on and around Norfolk Street. There's lots of options. From increasing park space, to creating slower traffic flows using a variety of methods that would make getting around by bike and on foot safer and easier.

We want your ideas and feedback. We want to know if a Safe Active Street is right for your neighbourhood and what that could look like?

The Safe Active Street program is an initiative of the Department of Transport. Using a range of improvements, local streets are upgraded to create an environment where traffic speeds are limited to 30 km/h and the volume of traffic is low. In most cases the streets have enhanced landscaping to help create an environment where people feel welcome and it becomes safer to walk and ride.

This project, jointly funded by Department of Transport and City of Vincent, will explore a potential Safe Active Street route which could include parts of Venn Street, Norfolk Street, Alma Road, Ethel Street and Throssell Street.

Here's a map with the proposed route shown in green.



Have your say

Ideas and Information Community Forums and Drop-in Sessions

The project has just started, the next step is a community forum. We'll show some examples of streets and a range of traffic calming possibilities and we'd like to know what you think. There are two in-person forum opportunities plus an online option. There's also a mid-week drop-in opportunity at North Perth Common.

It's important to remember this is about creating the neighbourhood that Vincent residents will love to live in. We are asking what you want, and whether these ideas work for you or not.






Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Norfolk Neighbourhood?

The Norfolk Neighbourhood is located between Fitzgerald Street, William Street, Walcott Street and Vincent Street. It's the area with local residential streets between the the much busier 'distributor' roads. The Safe Active Street is being considered would have a large portion of the route along Norfolk Street, and most streets within this area intersect with Norfolk Street.

The Safe Active Street might also connect to the intersection of Palmerston Street and Glendower Street, so we have also included a small area south of Vincent Street in the study zone.


Why is the Norfolk Neighbourhood being considered for a Safe Active Street?

Residents in the area have expressed concerns about an increase in motor vehicle traffic which has resulted in lower amenity and feeling less safe.

The proposed route would provide good walking and riding connections between the Hyde Park area and the schools north of Walcott Street, including Mount Lawley Senior High School.

The route is part of the Long Term Cycle Network and a logical north-south alternative which is safer than using Fitzgerald Street and William Street.


What is the Long Term Cycle Network?

The Department of Transport and 32 local government authorities, including the City of Vincent, have collaborated to agree on a network of strategic cross-boundary routes that link parks, schools, community facilities and transport services. The aim is to make cycling a convenient and viable transport option.


How is the project being funded?

The project is jointly funded between the Department of Transport and the City of Vincent. Each stage of the project is funded separately.


What stage is the project at?

A feasibility study has been completed. This determined the best route and highlighted some of the improvements required. We are now seeking feedback on a range of design possibilities and if there is community support for the project.


Has construction been planned?

We are still in the early design stage of the project. No dates have been set. We want to know if the community support the project first.


I don't live along the route, why should I be interested?

The route being considered mostly runs through the centre of the Norfork Neighbourhood but there are twelve streets that intersect with the route. The project will offer an opportunity for residents to consider changes to each of these intersections that could improve safety, reduce rat-running and increase the number of trees in the area.


What does a Safe Active Street look like?

There is no fixed design for a Safe Active Street. There’s a range of improvements that can be incorporated to improve safety and make the street more appealing. The design can be tailored to suit the local environment and the circumstances of each neighbourhood. A range of ‘design tools’ can be used, these include:

  • Raised platforms at intersections
  • Additional tree planting to visually narrow the street
  • Single-lane slow-points with additional vegetation
  • Introducing new medians for safer pedestrian crossing
  • Adding pocket parks which allow walking and riding connections
  • Adding a diagonal diversion to four-way intersections to reduce driver rat-running and allow walking and cycling in all directions
  • Raised pedestrian crossings at entry to streets

We'll be showing examples of these design tools, and more, at the community forums.


Are there examples of Safe Active Streets in Western Australia?

There are several Safe Active Streets in Western Australia. Several have been completed, others are still being developed. Locations include Bassendean, Bayswater, Geraldton, Nedlands, Melville and Mount Hawthorn. More information is available on the Department of Transport website.


Would there be changes to car parking?

With some Safe Active Street designs, car parking is rearranged and trees are planted to reduce sight-lines. This helps to slow drivers in residential streets. The design of the Norfolk Neighbourhood Safe Active Street is in the earlier stages and it’s a good time to give feedback on this idea.



Some ideas for re-imagining streets

The proposed Safe Active Street route is 1.6 kilometres long and passes through 12 intersections. Some of these streets are great right now and there's not much to improve. Other parts have drivers travelling too fast and could benefit from having less traffic. We also know some of the intersectons could be made safer.

Would you like some of these intersectons changed? Can they be made safer and more attractive as well?

Most people are familiar with speed-bumps and other common traffic management devices, but here's a few attractive solutions to stimulate ideas. Some of these ideas could be incorporated into a new Safe Active Street.


Applecross

Intersection of Macrae Road and Gairloch Street

Previously a standard four-way intersection, two new cul-de-sacs were created on Macrae Road with separate paths for walking and cycling passing through. Macrae Road runs parallel to Canning Highway and had become a rat-run for drivers trying to avoid traffic lights. This change resulted in quieter streets and a much safer route for people riding bikes. Additional tree planting also increased amenity.

"Before" Google image 2015

"After" Google image 2021

A raised platform and change in surface colour was also added across the intersection which helps to slow motor vehicle traffic approaching along Gairloch Street.



O’Connor

Intersection of Clarke Street and Hines Road

Previously a T-junction with busy road, a cul-de-sac with small park was created on Clarke Street. The intersection at Hines Road was near the crest of a hill which resulted in increased risk of crashes. This change improved safety for everyone and provided more recreation space. A path through the park ensured the street remained open to Hines Road for people walking and riding.

This example has been in place for about 20 years. It demontrates how changing an intersection and realoccating street space for people can give immediate safety benefits, but also provides an opportunity to increase community amenity over time as funds become available.

This small park at the end of a cul-de-sac now has play equipment, a shelter, picnic table and benches plus a tiny library provided by the local community.

The amount of facilities in this example exceed what can be provided by implementation phase of a Safe Active Street, but it can help stimulate our imagination for how our streets can be better in a few years time with thoughtful planning.



Rivervale

Copley Park (previously Copley Road)

This fantastic street transformation began in 1975. It was once a conventional asphalt street with two lanes for motor vehicles, grass verges, no footpaths and no trees.

The first step was to increase the amount of green space and reduce the width of the paved area.

Access by car was limited to residents and visitors by installing mid-block bollards.

Trees were planted and garden beds introduced. The street became more like a park.

Residents can reach their garages by paths gently winding between the trees.

Four of the intersecting streets were made into cul-de-sacs, but people walking and riding have no restrictions. There are shared paths connecting all streets.

There are no kerbs. The rain can simply run off the street's paving to help the gardens.

This is a mature example of good street design. It's been gradually improved over 45 years and is now considered a park by most people even though cars are still permitted.

The basic principals used in the design of this street can be applied to Safe Active Streets. Learn more about Copley Road at the upcoming community forum.





Shenton Park

Keightly Road West

This diagonal diversion was constructed at the intersection of Keightly Road West and Rosalie Street in the late 1980s. The standard footpaths have been retained on both sides of each street. People riding bikes can pass through a convenient central ramp easily.

A second diagonal diversion can also be found one block to the west at the intersection of Keightly Road West and Hensman Road. The combination of these two devices has the effect of reducing rat-running drivers through the area, lowering speed and making the intersections much safer. The extension of garden beds and additional trees add to the amenity.

This is a successful design. Keightly Road West is a popular route for people walking and riding bikes and the street will soon be included in a new Safe Active Street route across Shenton Park.



Doubleview

Moorland Street

Narrowing of street to reduce speeding. This gives additional space to plant trees that will be able to grow with less restrictions from power lines. This example is part of City of Stirling's Moorland Street Safe Active Street.



Nedlands

Elizabeth Street

Raised platform across whole intersection. This improves pedestrian amenity by creating a flatter street crossing and motor vehicle traffic is slowed before entering the intersection which reduces the risk of crashes.


Bayswater

Leake Street

Road humps can be used to reduce motor vehicle speeds. These can be used at the approach to intersections or mid-block.


Perth

Palmerston Street

One lane slow point with hump in centre, safe by-passes for people on bikes plus additional vegetation.





A safe, environmentally friendly neighbourhood that puts people first. That’s our vision and we need your help to decide how that could look for North Perth and Mount Lawley.

The City of Vincent has the opportunity to make improvements and changes on and around Norfolk Street. There's lots of options. From increasing park space, to creating slower traffic flows using a variety of methods that would make getting around by bike and on foot safer and easier.

We want your ideas and feedback. We want to know if a Safe Active Street is right for your neighbourhood and what that could look like?

The Safe Active Street program is an initiative of the Department of Transport. Using a range of improvements, local streets are upgraded to create an environment where traffic speeds are limited to 30 km/h and the volume of traffic is low. In most cases the streets have enhanced landscaping to help create an environment where people feel welcome and it becomes safer to walk and ride.

This project, jointly funded by Department of Transport and City of Vincent, will explore a potential Safe Active Street route which could include parts of Venn Street, Norfolk Street, Alma Road, Ethel Street and Throssell Street.

Here's a map with the proposed route shown in green.



Have your say

Ideas and Information Community Forums and Drop-in Sessions

The project has just started, the next step is a community forum. We'll show some examples of streets and a range of traffic calming possibilities and we'd like to know what you think. There are two in-person forum opportunities plus an online option. There's also a mid-week drop-in opportunity at North Perth Common.

It's important to remember this is about creating the neighbourhood that Vincent residents will love to live in. We are asking what you want, and whether these ideas work for you or not.






Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Norfolk Neighbourhood?

The Norfolk Neighbourhood is located between Fitzgerald Street, William Street, Walcott Street and Vincent Street. It's the area with local residential streets between the the much busier 'distributor' roads. The Safe Active Street is being considered would have a large portion of the route along Norfolk Street, and most streets within this area intersect with Norfolk Street.

The Safe Active Street might also connect to the intersection of Palmerston Street and Glendower Street, so we have also included a small area south of Vincent Street in the study zone.


Why is the Norfolk Neighbourhood being considered for a Safe Active Street?

Residents in the area have expressed concerns about an increase in motor vehicle traffic which has resulted in lower amenity and feeling less safe.

The proposed route would provide good walking and riding connections between the Hyde Park area and the schools north of Walcott Street, including Mount Lawley Senior High School.

The route is part of the Long Term Cycle Network and a logical north-south alternative which is safer than using Fitzgerald Street and William Street.


What is the Long Term Cycle Network?

The Department of Transport and 32 local government authorities, including the City of Vincent, have collaborated to agree on a network of strategic cross-boundary routes that link parks, schools, community facilities and transport services. The aim is to make cycling a convenient and viable transport option.


How is the project being funded?

The project is jointly funded between the Department of Transport and the City of Vincent. Each stage of the project is funded separately.


What stage is the project at?

A feasibility study has been completed. This determined the best route and highlighted some of the improvements required. We are now seeking feedback on a range of design possibilities and if there is community support for the project.


Has construction been planned?

We are still in the early design stage of the project. No dates have been set. We want to know if the community support the project first.


I don't live along the route, why should I be interested?

The route being considered mostly runs through the centre of the Norfork Neighbourhood but there are twelve streets that intersect with the route. The project will offer an opportunity for residents to consider changes to each of these intersections that could improve safety, reduce rat-running and increase the number of trees in the area.


What does a Safe Active Street look like?

There is no fixed design for a Safe Active Street. There’s a range of improvements that can be incorporated to improve safety and make the street more appealing. The design can be tailored to suit the local environment and the circumstances of each neighbourhood. A range of ‘design tools’ can be used, these include:

  • Raised platforms at intersections
  • Additional tree planting to visually narrow the street
  • Single-lane slow-points with additional vegetation
  • Introducing new medians for safer pedestrian crossing
  • Adding pocket parks which allow walking and riding connections
  • Adding a diagonal diversion to four-way intersections to reduce driver rat-running and allow walking and cycling in all directions
  • Raised pedestrian crossings at entry to streets

We'll be showing examples of these design tools, and more, at the community forums.


Are there examples of Safe Active Streets in Western Australia?

There are several Safe Active Streets in Western Australia. Several have been completed, others are still being developed. Locations include Bassendean, Bayswater, Geraldton, Nedlands, Melville and Mount Hawthorn. More information is available on the Department of Transport website.


Would there be changes to car parking?

With some Safe Active Street designs, car parking is rearranged and trees are planted to reduce sight-lines. This helps to slow drivers in residential streets. The design of the Norfolk Neighbourhood Safe Active Street is in the earlier stages and it’s a good time to give feedback on this idea.



Some ideas for re-imagining streets

The proposed Safe Active Street route is 1.6 kilometres long and passes through 12 intersections. Some of these streets are great right now and there's not much to improve. Other parts have drivers travelling too fast and could benefit from having less traffic. We also know some of the intersectons could be made safer.

Would you like some of these intersectons changed? Can they be made safer and more attractive as well?

Most people are familiar with speed-bumps and other common traffic management devices, but here's a few attractive solutions to stimulate ideas. Some of these ideas could be incorporated into a new Safe Active Street.


Applecross

Intersection of Macrae Road and Gairloch Street

Previously a standard four-way intersection, two new cul-de-sacs were created on Macrae Road with separate paths for walking and cycling passing through. Macrae Road runs parallel to Canning Highway and had become a rat-run for drivers trying to avoid traffic lights. This change resulted in quieter streets and a much safer route for people riding bikes. Additional tree planting also increased amenity.

"Before" Google image 2015

"After" Google image 2021

A raised platform and change in surface colour was also added across the intersection which helps to slow motor vehicle traffic approaching along Gairloch Street.



O’Connor

Intersection of Clarke Street and Hines Road

Previously a T-junction with busy road, a cul-de-sac with small park was created on Clarke Street. The intersection at Hines Road was near the crest of a hill which resulted in increased risk of crashes. This change improved safety for everyone and provided more recreation space. A path through the park ensured the street remained open to Hines Road for people walking and riding.

This example has been in place for about 20 years. It demontrates how changing an intersection and realoccating street space for people can give immediate safety benefits, but also provides an opportunity to increase community amenity over time as funds become available.

This small park at the end of a cul-de-sac now has play equipment, a shelter, picnic table and benches plus a tiny library provided by the local community.

The amount of facilities in this example exceed what can be provided by implementation phase of a Safe Active Street, but it can help stimulate our imagination for how our streets can be better in a few years time with thoughtful planning.



Rivervale

Copley Park (previously Copley Road)

This fantastic street transformation began in 1975. It was once a conventional asphalt street with two lanes for motor vehicles, grass verges, no footpaths and no trees.

The first step was to increase the amount of green space and reduce the width of the paved area.

Access by car was limited to residents and visitors by installing mid-block bollards.

Trees were planted and garden beds introduced. The street became more like a park.

Residents can reach their garages by paths gently winding between the trees.

Four of the intersecting streets were made into cul-de-sacs, but people walking and riding have no restrictions. There are shared paths connecting all streets.

There are no kerbs. The rain can simply run off the street's paving to help the gardens.

This is a mature example of good street design. It's been gradually improved over 45 years and is now considered a park by most people even though cars are still permitted.

The basic principals used in the design of this street can be applied to Safe Active Streets. Learn more about Copley Road at the upcoming community forum.





Shenton Park

Keightly Road West

This diagonal diversion was constructed at the intersection of Keightly Road West and Rosalie Street in the late 1980s. The standard footpaths have been retained on both sides of each street. People riding bikes can pass through a convenient central ramp easily.

A second diagonal diversion can also be found one block to the west at the intersection of Keightly Road West and Hensman Road. The combination of these two devices has the effect of reducing rat-running drivers through the area, lowering speed and making the intersections much safer. The extension of garden beds and additional trees add to the amenity.

This is a successful design. Keightly Road West is a popular route for people walking and riding bikes and the street will soon be included in a new Safe Active Street route across Shenton Park.



Doubleview

Moorland Street

Narrowing of street to reduce speeding. This gives additional space to plant trees that will be able to grow with less restrictions from power lines. This example is part of City of Stirling's Moorland Street Safe Active Street.



Nedlands

Elizabeth Street

Raised platform across whole intersection. This improves pedestrian amenity by creating a flatter street crossing and motor vehicle traffic is slowed before entering the intersection which reduces the risk of crashes.


Bayswater

Leake Street

Road humps can be used to reduce motor vehicle speeds. These can be used at the approach to intersections or mid-block.


Perth

Palmerston Street

One lane slow point with hump in centre, safe by-passes for people on bikes plus additional vegetation.





Page last updated: 18 May 2022, 01:13 PM